Photography Information

 

Digital Imaging Explained




Digital Imaging is a process where an electronic photograph, scanned document, or image is converted into a series of electronic dots called pixels. Pixels is an acronym for "picture elements".

After the image is converted, or digitized, it is stored on a memory storage device which may be a hard drive or some sort of electronic storage device such as a memory stick. The pixels are stored in a compressed format to save storage space.

As each pixel is being created it is assigned a color value, called a tonal value, of black, white, shades of grey, or an actual color. These pixels must be processed by a piece of software in order for them to be called up and viewed as an actual image later.

Traditional cameras capture images onto film while digital cameras use an electronic chip known as a Charged Coupling Device (CCD). The CCD is actually a grid of miniature light-sensitive diodes. These diodes convert photons (light) that strikes them into electrons (electrical impulses). The technical name for these diodes is 'photosite'. The brighter the light is that hits the photosite the stronger the electrical charge is that's produced.

After converting the photons into electrons, a mini-computer, located inside of the camera, reads the stored electrical value in each photograph. Then a built-in analog-to-digital converter turns the stored electrical value into a digital value. These digital values are then stored on the cameras memory storage device. When these digital values are recalled by software, and displayed on a screen, they reproduce the image that was originally captured by the camera or digital input device.

The digital image that is created by the CCD is huge. It's far too big to be easily stored in the relatively little amount of storage space that's available to a digital camera. Accordingly, the camera's computer compresses the image to make it smaller.

There are two basic methods for achieving this compression. The first method takes advantage of repetitive patterns in the image. For example, if you are taking a picture of an airplane that is flying in the sky, a lot of the picture will be a chunk of blue sky. The camera recognizes that there are multiple parts of the image containing the same digital information, so it only records a small piece of the sky. Then it simply creates a map to tell it where the rest of the sky belongs. When the picture is ultimately displayed the sky appears exactly the same as it did in the original image when it was first captured. The only difference is that the overall storage requirements were reduced thanks to the camera's clever mapping techniques.

The other method uses a procedure called irrelevancy. This methodology automatically removes digital information that is not visible to the human eye such an infra red light.

Digital imaging is amazing yet we have only started witnessing the revolutionary changes that are yet to come.

About The Author

Warren Lynch has been shooting commercial photography since 1979. Clients include Several Regional and National accounts. Sign up for"The Digital Dose" and receive his tips every other week for FREE! http://www.photopheed.com.

contact@photopheed.com


MORE RESOURCES:

The News (subscription)

Photography is hobby for all ages | Life | The News
The News (subscription)
Photography is perhaps the most powerful medium. Uncompromising in its integrity, it captures reality without regard for consequences.

and more »


Fstoppers

Your Photography Is Political
Fstoppers
We live in times of turmoil. The old fixed orders of the post-World-War-II globe have lately been called into question in new and unexpected ways. People are more engaged in politics than ever before during most of our lifetimes. Photography has always ...



Milford Daily News

Boston photography exhibit focuses Frederick Douglass
Milford Daily News
"He instantly recognized photography as a crucial aid to his vision of a free, democratic and egalitarian society," explains the introductory panel in the exhibit at the Museum of African American History in Boston. "To Douglass, photography was the ...

and more »


Digital Trends

Yes, you can take free online photo classes from Harvard and 5 others
Digital Trends
Nope, that's not a typo in the headline – you can take Harvard photography classes online for free. While any free online class, whether from an Ivy League or the best YouTubers out there, won't leave you with any sort of certification or degree, it ...



MyCentralJersey.com

Far Hills: Buck Garden Art & Photography Exhibit to open
MyCentralJersey.com
Somerset County Park Commission Leonard J. Buck Garden will anticipate the coming of spring by hosting the annual “Art & Photography Exhibit,” focusing on the beauty of the diverse moods and seasons of Buck Garden. READ: Somerset County Park ...



Rocky Mountain Collegian

Center for Fine Art Photography creates community involvement with monthly artist talks
Rocky Mountain Collegian
The Center for Fine Art Photography held an artist reception and talk Friday night, allowing the public not only to hear the photographers speak and present their artistic processes, but also converse one-on-one afterward. The event occurs monthly and ...



UConn Daily Campus

Developing student perspective on landscape photography
UConn Daily Campus
Janet L. Pritchard talks about her photography project in the Yellowstone National Park. The project explores our national love affair with America's first national park through the lenses of nature, culture, and history. (Zhelun Lang/The Daily Campus).



Daily Mississippian

Ann Fisher-Wirth's poetry, Maude Schuyler Clay's photography to be brought to life Monday at Ford Center
Daily Mississippian
When you begin to hear voices, it's often best to see a psychiatrist, but when award-winning poet Ann Fisher-Wirth heard voices while looking at photographs by Maude Schuyler Clay, she knew they were calling her to capture these stories in verse ...



PetaPixel (blog)

Fetishizing an Entire Culture Through Photography
PetaPixel (blog)
Fashion photography has always had an element of the fantastical and aspirational. Fashion itself tends to be very appropriative. Case in point: Kellyanne Conway's Gucci-designed Inauguration outfit. No offense to professional dancers, but this was ...



New York Times

Shopping for Photography Books With Simone Rocha - The New ...
New York Times
On a freezing afternoon smack in the middle of New York Fashion Week, the Irish designer Simone Rocha is roaming SoHo and Chelsea on the hunt for vintage ...

and more »

Google News

home | site map
© 2006 KeralaClick.com