Photography Information

 

Photography 101 Part 1




Photography 101

Part One

Equipment: camera, meter, flash, tripod

This article is a simplified photography course directed at new photographers out there who want to know where to start.

If you really want to learn photography the first thing you need is a good affordable and reliable camera. It must, and I repeat must, be able to shoot in fully manual and fully auto focus modes. (This leaves out any digital cameras on the market right now, sorry.) To really learn photography you must understand the equipment. You'll need to learn how manipulating the shutter speed, aperture, and focus will have a dramatic effect on your photos. Meters, if you have a camera that can work in a fully manual mode it should have an internal meter suitable for what you will be doing. Tripod, you're going to need one whether it's portrait work or landscapes you'll need one eventually. Luckily you don't have to spend a lot here. Just something lightweight and durable. Flash, you can buy a separate camera mounted flash, which is great if you can afford it. Consider what kind of photography that you will be doing though. If you're going to do mostly nature and landscape, you may only need the fill flash that comes with most cameras today. If you plan on doing portraiture alone you will want to consider a camera mounted flash that has an adjustable angle.

Film, film speed to be exact. Slower speeds (25 to 400) are intended for portraiture and landscape photography. Faster speeds (600 and above) are intended for actions shots and photojournalism. So first you need to know what you going out to photograph and make sure that you have the appropriate film for the job.

Now that you have the camera loaded with film consider shutter speed. Do you want to blur motion, or freeze it? If there is no motion at all what shutter speed do you need to expose the scene with natural light. From 1/60th and down to the bulb setting will blur most motion. For example if you want to blur the water in a waterfall, a setting of 1/30th should work. (You'll need a tripod though.) 1/125th is a normal setting for most shots. On many cameras the 125th setting is marked in a different color to make it obvious. If you want to freeze action you'll need to start with 1/500th and work up from there. The faster the motion the faster the shutter speed needed to stop motion. Many cameras go up to 1/2000th of a second. If you're trying to use natural light alone in a scene you will want to determine the aperture first and then see what shutter speed you need to properly expose the scene for available light. (Keep in mind sometimes there isn't enough light.)

Aperture, these are the set of numbers on your lens closest to the body of the camera. They can go from 1.8 to 22, and they are referred to as F-stops. These numbers determine how much light reaches the film inside of your camera. Most internal meters will blink on the appropriate aperture for the shutter speed that you've set, or the speed you've set will blink if your F-stop is correct for the speed. Both the F-stop and shutter speed can be changed to expose the scene correctly. Consider that the faster the shutter speed the more light will be needed to expose the scene correctly. This makes logical sense if you think about it. If the shutter isn't open as long, fast shutter speed, then there is less light able to make it to the film and so the scene must be brighter to expose correctly. To learn, bracket your shots. Take the first shot at the aperture suggested by your meter, move one stop up, take a photo, one down, take another photo.

Flash, I personally like shooting with natural light whenever possible and at most I use a fill flash. But if you're going to do portrait work then most of the time you may be indoors and you will need a flash sometimes. For the amateur the fill flash units that are on the top of most of today's cameras are wonderful for basic work. You will have to read your manual on your particular flash unit to learn what it can and can't do. This is where the camera that is fully manual and fully auto is great for the amateur. You can usually set it so that the camera will meter and set the flash output accordingly and then you still can control the shutter speed and aperture.

This week's assignment: Have several rolls of 400 speed film, find a subject that you can work with preferably something that won't move, and shoot one roll of film. Shoot some of the roll in the morning, afternoon, and evening. Bracket every shot, take notes on time of day and light conditions, and what your settings (aperture) were for each frame, keep the film speed the same for the entire roll. Have the film developed and examine the photos. You should be able to see a difference in each frame. You'll need to repeat this procedure until you feel that you understand the relationship between shutter speed and aperture, and every camera and meter has it's own quirks and differences, you're camera will act differently than someone else's. This way you will learn you own particular camera as well. Once you have a sense of how aperture works you won't need to bracket every shot you take, you may only need to do it in cases where you want to be extra safe on exposing the subject correctly.

If you have some specific questions please visit my Photography Forum at: http://kellypaalphotography.com/v-web/bulletin/bb/index.php

Copyright 2004 Kelly Paal

Kelly Paal is a Freelance Nature and Landscape Photographer, exhibiting nationally and internationally. Recently she started her own business Kelly Paal Photography (www.kellypaalphotography.com). She has an educational background in photography, business, and commercial art. She enjoys applying graphic design and photography principles to her web design.


MORE RESOURCES:

Three Common Misconceptions About Histograms in Photography
Lifehacker
If you're a relatively experienced photographer you probably have a basic understanding of your camera's histogram, the graph that acts as a visualization of the ...

and more »


Fstoppers

Why Landscape Photography Isn't Always Glamorous
Fstoppers
As we start filming our newest tutorial, "Photographing the World With Elia Locardi 3," this seems like a timely video. When we see the gorgeous images landscape photographers produce, it's easy to think that landscape photography is an ideal ...



PetaPixel (blog)

This is the First Known Photograph of a US Presidential Inauguration
PetaPixel (blog)
The Capitol was still under construction on March 4th, 1857, when photographer John Wood set up his wet plate collodion camera and captured the first known ...
The First Photo Of A Presidential Inauguration Was Shot With Wet ...Digital Trends

all 3 news articles »


Photography Friday: Chang Chungliang
Shanghaiist
Chang Chungliang 張仲良 is a Taiwanese artist who graduated from the Taipei National University of the Arts. He completed his advanced studies in France at the Ecole supérieure d'art et de design Le Havre-Rouen (ESADHaR) and later at the Sorbonne I in ...



Around Town: Local mom, South Fayette teacher turn love of photography into business
Tribune-Review
Maggie Zatolochenko's interest in photography started as a child, when she seemed to notice the beauty in things others did not. Marriage and four children later, the South Fayette resident has been professionally specializing in family, children's and ...



Lifehacker

Take a Free Digital Photography Class From Harvard - Lifehacker
Lifehacker
Photography isn't as easy as many people assume, but you can learn the basics on your own. And if you need some structured lessons, this 12-module course ...
Updated: Harvard - NOT that Harvard - offers a free course on digital ...imaging resource
Photography from Harvard to App Design from MIT: Here are 10 free ...Digit

all 4 news articles »


PetaPixel (blog)

Real Talk: The Ugly Side of Landscape Photography - PetaPixel
PetaPixel (blog)
To the uninitiated, landscape photography might seem like a pretty swell gig. You imagine traveling to incredible vista after incredible vista, reconnecting with ...

and more »


Chicago Tribune

Chicago drone photographer pays FAA $200000 over alleged airspace violations
Chicago Tribune
Photographer Mark Segal shows a picture of one of his remote control helicopters carrying a stuffed animal at his SkyPan International office studio Jan. 18, 2017, in Chicago. SkyPan has agreed to pay the Federal Aviation Administration $200,000 to ...
Drone photography company to pay $200000 fineBBC News
Drone-photography company fined $200000 by FAAUSA TODAY
Drone-Photography Company Reaches Settlement with FAAFlying Magazine
ATWOnline -Federal Aviation Administration -Federal Aviation Administration -Skypan International
all 50 news articles »


CNN

Smile! The art of equine photography - CNN.com
CNN
Asuncion Pineyrua travels the world photographing the world's most famous race horses.

and more »


Forward

On The Eve Of Trump's Inauguration, This Exhibition Of Protest Photography Is As Fresh As Ever
Forward
How exactly should one photograph a political demonstration? There are a few schools of thought, I imagine, and it may be helpful to think of these approaches in similar terms to those used to discuss the various approaches to literary translation ...


Google News

home | site map
© 2006 KeralaClick.com